Films : End of Restriction : all

animate! synopsis

The teenage world via Apple Mac. From childhood loft dreams to the horse latitudes, village life through the eyes of a boy on a bicycle. Conservatism and decay. A black and white film in remembered colour.

short synopsis

End of Restriction enters into the claustrophobic world of a teenage boy growing up in an English village. The film follows the boy’s cycle journey, on which we discover, through his eyes, the general decay and conservative nature of the village.

key credits

director
Robert Bradbrook
editor
Lol Gellor
music
Donald Cuthbertson

Robert Bradbrook

artist’s photo

17 August 2001

artist’s website

Bradbrook Films

Robert’s own website

a film by Robert Bradbrook

direction

director
Robert Bradbrook

cast in picture

cast
Andrew Selmes
Kim Fortin
Ken Wills
Mary Wills

image personnel

editor
Lol Gellor

sound personnel

music
Donald Cuthbertson

support

special thanks

Culural Partnerships and Pat Gavin

primary funding

Arts council of England/Channel Four Animate! award

© Robert Bradbrook 1994

film still: Sleepy village: This scene is the first shot you see of the village after going through the viaduct. I was very new to 3D modelling at the time and had just learnt how to animate the cameras and so during much of the production one would enter the village flying over the viaduct with a really dramatic swooping camera. It was one of the first times I realised you could do really great things with the software which weren’t at all suitable for the type of film I was making!

Sleepy village: This scene is the first shot you see of the village after going through the viaduct. I was very new to 3D modelling at the time and had just learnt how to animate the cameras and so during much of the production one would enter the village flying over the viaduct with a really dramatic swooping camera. It was one of the first times I realised you could do really great things with the software which weren’t at all suitable for the type of film I was making!

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click on image for full size still

film still: The old footsteps: The first piece of 3D animation that I had ever made and actually liked was of a set of London Underground escalators. This scene was a simple way of repeating it, but in a Yorkshire village! The picture of the man was taken by my brother David… he had taken loads of photographs of men at an old railway station which had steam trains travelling up and down. Because they were so wrapped up with the event he could get really good candid shots of them lost in their thoughts.

The old footsteps: The first piece of 3D animation that I had ever made and actually liked was of a set of London Underground escalators. This scene was a simple way of repeating it, but in a Yorkshire village! The picture of the man was taken by my brother David… he had taken loads of photographs of men at an old railway station which had steam trains travelling up and down. Because they were so wrapped up with the event he could get really good candid shots of them lost in their thoughts.

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click on image for full size still

film still: People’s Friend: The woman is my brother in-law’s mother… I managed to convince her to have her picture taken during Christmas Day. Throughout the film there are bits of graphics incorporated into the pictures that help to describe the people in the village. This is my favourite, as the magazine had been a long-standing joke for me and it worked well against the ‘nosy parker’ neighbour. The scene also contains the first time I tried two features that I seem to endlessly return to: window sills with photographs, and shadows of moving people where the people don’t exist!

People’s Friend: The woman is my brother in-law’s mother… I managed to convince her to have her picture taken during Christmas Day. Throughout the film there are bits of graphics incorporated into the pictures that help to describe the people in the village. This is my favourite, as the magazine had been a long-standing joke for me and it worked well against the ‘nosy parker’ neighbour. The scene also contains the first time I tried two features that I seem to endlessly return to: window sills with photographs, and shadows of moving people where the people don’t exist!

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click on image for full size still

film still: The old garage: My favourite shot from the film. It was also the first time that I learnt you could put textures onto the 3D models inside the 3D application! Up until this point I had been applying them afterwards in Photoshop!! This explains why throughout most of the film the graphics and digital noise float on top of the images and don’t really feel integrated with the scenes. To get the pictures of the children I spent the day cycling around my sister’s village (which partly inspired the film)... and I still feel guilty for telling them that if they had their picture taken they would appear in a big blockbuster film.

The old garage: My favourite shot from the film. It was also the first time that I learnt you could put textures onto the 3D models inside the 3D application! Up until this point I had been applying them afterwards in Photoshop!! This explains why throughout most of the film the graphics and digital noise float on top of the images and don’t really feel integrated with the scenes. To get the pictures of the children I spent the day cycling around my sister’s village (which partly inspired the film)... and I still feel guilty for telling them that if they had their picture taken they would appear in a big blockbuster film.

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click on image for full size still

film still: Level crossing: The train that goes past at the level crossing was filmed by me and my brother John in the West Country (my films are always real family affairs). I was disappointed by how short the train was and it didn’t allow me time to mix in all of my London photographs over the scene. So I just looped the passing carriages. I was really chuffed to receive a letter from a train-spotter who saw the film on Channel 4 and said he loved it but was puzzled which railway line had a train with so many carriages!

Level crossing: The train that goes past at the level crossing was filmed by me and my brother John in the West Country (my films are always real family affairs). I was disappointed by how short the train was and it didn’t allow me time to mix in all of my London photographs over the scene. So I just looped the passing carriages. I was really chuffed to receive a letter from a train-spotter who saw the film on Channel 4 and said he loved it but was puzzled which railway line had a train with so many carriages!

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click on image for full size still

master copy format

format
BetaSP
colour or black & white
black & white

video distribution format

video format
BetaSP
screen aspect ratio
4:3
video standard
PAL
sound type
stereo

film distribution format

film format
16mm
screen aspect ratio
1:1.33
sound type
mono

distributor

LUX
info@lux.org.uk
+44 (0)20 7503 3980
www.lux.org.uk